Showing Polio the Finger: A Lesson in Public Health

As students of Public Health, we, in India, are witnessing history in the making. It is not often that one gets to see, and be a part of a revolution that is the eradication of a disease. I know that global polio eradication is still under threat because of multiple issues. And with countries in which eradication had been achieved falling prey to re-emergence of … Continue reading Showing Polio the Finger: A Lesson in Public Health

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IEC in Public Health: What can Public Health Learn from Steve Jobs?

I was watching some cool advertisements of an online portal and was wondering that why the public health messages that went out were so boring and hackneyed, poorly designed and “turn off”-ish! In an era where advertising is a buzzword and online or offline marketing is bringing the consumer and provider closer together, it is a sad affair that public health affairs have stayed out of … Continue reading IEC in Public Health: What can Public Health Learn from Steve Jobs?

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Predatory Open Access: Part 3 – Research Spoofs and Publication Faux-Pas

Ever since the Science paper came out earlier this week, the world of academia has been a-flutter with excitement and controlled outrage. In the midst of all this, I decided to do a series of posts examining the situation at hand. This is the third and concluding portion of the series and prior to this: Predatory Open Access: Part 1 – A Sting Op and Indictment of … Continue reading Predatory Open Access: Part 3 – Research Spoofs and Publication Faux-Pas

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Predatory Open Access: Part 2 – Peer Review in OA and Ethics of “Sting Op Research”

Ever since the Science article about a sting operation to reveal the murky business that goes on in the name of Open Access journals came out, the academic world has been thrown into a tizzy. I decided to do a series of posts exploring the issue of predatory open access and the issues surrounding them. The first post in this series can be found here: Predatory Open Access: … Continue reading Predatory Open Access: Part 2 – Peer Review in OA and Ethics of “Sting Op Research”

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Predatory Open Access: Part 1 – A Sting Op and Indictment of the OA Model

In the last couple of days, an article from Science has literally gone viral in the scientific circles. It is yet another indictment of what Jeffrey Beall has termed as Predatory Open Access. In a series of posts, I shall comment on this issue. In the first post of this series, I talk about briefly regarding the Science article that is making such waves. In the subsequent posts, … Continue reading Predatory Open Access: Part 1 – A Sting Op and Indictment of the OA Model

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Exhibitionism in Medical Education: The Brindley Lecture – Heralding A Sexual Revolution

The first boom in treatment for male erectile dysfunction came in the 1920s and 1930 when the Russian-origin French surgeon Serge Abramovitch Voronoff started to prescribe surgical implantation of monkey testicles in the human scrotum to augment sexual prowess. This gained quite a bit of fan following for a couple of decades and brough Voronoff a lot of fame, acclaim, and of course, money. Now … Continue reading Exhibitionism in Medical Education: The Brindley Lecture – Heralding A Sexual Revolution

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US Shutdown: PubMed, Twitter, Trolls and Medicine

The news in Twitterville and Facebookland is the US Government Shutdown. It seems pretty complicated if you ask me, with a lot of financial considerations being taken into account to understand why the government is shutting down, so, I will use internet memes that have been doing the rounds, in an effort to clarify my stand wherever it becomes wobbly on the logical nature. Here … Continue reading US Shutdown: PubMed, Twitter, Trolls and Medicine

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