Penile Cancer: Another Reason to Stop Banging Animals: (Insert Zoophilia Joke)

First up, I cannot believe the numbers! This is awe-inspiring. I read the abstract three times in order to convince myself that I was not seeing things. More than the results of the study itself what intrigues me no ends is how the researchers got the participants to open up about screwing with Billy. Billy as in Billy, The Goat. Not as in Billy Ray … Continue reading Penile Cancer: Another Reason to Stop Banging Animals: (Insert Zoophilia Joke)

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National Conference on Students’ Medical Research

The Community Medicine department of Medical College, Thiruvananthapuram is organizing the 5th National Conference on Students’ Medical Research. The theme for this year is: Translational Medicine. Their website has more details. Here is their brochure: Their website (which is very chic, easy to navigate and user friendly, something we are not accustomed to while browsing conference websites) has a wonderful justification for the selection of … Continue reading National Conference on Students’ Medical Research

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Why the BMJ Should Not Follow NEJM Author Ban Policy

Fiona Godlee has written a very interesting Editorial in the BMJ and this tweet of hers made me think on this issue: For a while in the 90s NEJM banned editorials and reviews from authors linked to industry. Should the BMJ try this? http://bit.ly/rczXJt — fiona godlee (@fgodlee) August 11, 2011 I oppose the blanket ban mainly on principle. I know that it sounds weird, … Continue reading Why the BMJ Should Not Follow NEJM Author Ban Policy

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Are patients really “worse off” with older docs?

ResearchBlogging.orgIn what appears to be a largely counter intuitive result, research by the American Journal of Medicine has unearthed that patients end up faring worse when treated by older doctors or more experienced doctors. This Reuters article delves into the issue and discusses several aspects of the study in great lengths. This study has also wracked up a heated discussion on the Evidence Based Healthcare email list on JISCmail, where the members do not seem to be overly shocked by the findings.

Here are my two cents: Continue reading “Are patients really “worse off” with older docs?”

Aaron Swartz: The Robbing Hood of Open Access?

Let me make it clear at the very outset that I am aware that AS is being indicted for hacking by the federal government on charges of “wire fraud, computer fraud”, etc and not for downloading too many journal articles off JSTOR (4.8 million, to be precise). Here is what the prosecution had to say: In a statement announcing the charges, a United States attorney, … Continue reading Aaron Swartz: The Robbing Hood of Open Access?

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Move Over Penis Captivus, Cello Scrotum and Guitar Nipple, we have TEXTER’S THUMB!

ResearchBlogging.orgThe medical mind has pondered and pondered on the existence of maladies of the body and mind which are real, and sometimes, not so real. While the cynics say that the latter exist only in the realms of medical lore, us medical history nuts always beg to differ. A number of exotic diseases have sprung up in the minds of physicians with particularly fertile imaginations over the years. Starting from Egerton Davis’ wonder-work on Penis Captivus, which captivated the mind of the discerning scientist for ages, to today’s avatar: the Texter’s Thumb.

laurel--hardy---brennender

Or Blackberry Thumb, as this recent CMAJ paper says (1).

Continue reading “Move Over Penis Captivus, Cello Scrotum and Guitar Nipple, we have TEXTER’S THUMB!”

Harry Potter and the Missing Trauma Cases

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ResearchBlogging.orgWith the last Harry Potter movie in the piping (due for a global release this weekend), it is understandable if the Potter craze gets a little irked this time around. And in true keeping with my Pottermania, in this post, I am going to examine the effect the release of Potter books/movies has on us.

I am not the first one to question the impact of Potter on kids and nor will I be the last. In their seminal paper in the BMJ, Gwilym et al establishes beyond reasonable doubt that no matter what the Potter books may do, they reduce ER visits of kids (due to trauma). The authors worked on the premise that: Continue reading “Harry Potter and the Missing Trauma Cases”