William Gosset: A True Student

Today I attended a Basic Epidemiology class meant for the undergraduate students as I thought it would be good to brush up on my basic knowledge. The topics for the day were Hypothesis Testing and An Introduction to Randomized Controlled Trials, both pretty important ones, no matter which level you are studying at. What struck me was the amount of details the students were taught. … Continue reading William Gosset: A True Student

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National Doctors’ Day & The Perils of Being an Indian (Junior) Doctor

“There is no greater reward in our profession than the knowledge that God has entrusted us with the physical care of His people. The Almighty has reserved for Himself the power to create life, but He has assigned to a few of us the responsibility of keeping in good repair the bodies in which this life is sustained.” – Dr. Elmer Hess On March 30, … Continue reading National Doctors’ Day & The Perils of Being an Indian (Junior) Doctor

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Comic Book Meets Medicine: Little Orphan Annie

One of the classic histopathological signs that we read of in Pathology quite often is the Orphan Annie Eye nucleus seen in Papillary carcinoma of the thyroid. This odd name has an interesting history behind it. One that dates back to two popcult references – one at the fag end of the 1800s and one that started slightly later, in 1924. The Bethesda guidelines for … Continue reading Comic Book Meets Medicine: Little Orphan Annie

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Charles Beevor: The Sign of a “Bloody” Jerk

Forgive the hyperbolic title. Do not take offense and read on before hating on me. Please note the post script for added justification for this inflammatory title, if you so feel. Thanks. Now on with the main show! Not the best known of neurologists, history has not been very kind to this amicable gentleman, who was, like many other physicians of his era, a very … Continue reading Charles Beevor: The Sign of a “Bloody” Jerk

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Santiago Ramon y Cajal: The Craftsman of Science

Scientists often are classed to be a group who are so lost within the intricacies of their vast subjects that they forget to look out into the world or explore the horizons of other specialties. We often tend to stereotype scientists into certain classes and blocks based on the achievements they garnered in their respective fields of specialization. We tend to forget that the truly … Continue reading Santiago Ramon y Cajal: The Craftsman of Science

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When Diseases Talk: Tuberculosis and Its Impression on Literature

A skiagram of the chest, showing miliary mottling, suggestive of Pulmonary Koch’s Disease in both lungs. there is also an opacity of the right upper lobe suggestive of active pulmonary disease. Patient was an 84 year old man, with a long history of TB for the treatment of which he was a multiple defaulter. The patient presented to the ER with severe respiratory distress and … Continue reading When Diseases Talk: Tuberculosis and Its Impression on Literature

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Argyll Robertson: Better Be His Pupil, Than Have It!

ResearchBlogging.orgArgyll Robertson pupils (“AR pupils”) are bilateral small pupils that constrict when the patient focuses on a near object (they “accommodate”), but do not constrict when exposed to bright light (they do not “react” to light). This condition is colloquially referred to as the “Whore’s Eye” because of the association with tertiary syphilis and because of the convenient mnemonic that, like a prostitute, they “accommodate but do not react” also because the pupils are “small and irregular.” They are a highly specific sign of neurosyphilis. In general, pupils that “accommodate but do not react” are said to show light-near dissociation. (Wikipedia)

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