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William Gosset: A True Student

Today I attended a Basic Epidemiology class meant for the undergraduate students as I thought it would be good to brush up on my basic knowledge. The topics for the day were Hypothesis Testing and An Introduction to Randomized Controlled Trials, both pretty important ones, no matter which level you are studying at. What struck me was the amount of details the students were taught. … Continue reading William Gosset: A True Student

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Are patients really “worse off” with older docs?

ResearchBlogging.orgIn what appears to be a largely counter intuitive result, research by the American Journal of Medicine has unearthed that patients end up faring worse when treated by older doctors or more experienced doctors. This Reuters article delves into the issue and discusses several aspects of the study in great lengths. This study has also wracked up a heated discussion on the Evidence Based Healthcare email list on JISCmail, where the members do not seem to be overly shocked by the findings.

Here are my two cents: Continue reading “Are patients really “worse off” with older docs?”

Move Over Penis Captivus, Cello Scrotum and Guitar Nipple, we have TEXTER’S THUMB!

ResearchBlogging.orgThe medical mind has pondered and pondered on the existence of maladies of the body and mind which are real, and sometimes, not so real. While the cynics say that the latter exist only in the realms of medical lore, us medical history nuts always beg to differ. A number of exotic diseases have sprung up in the minds of physicians with particularly fertile imaginations over the years. Starting from Egerton Davis’ wonder-work on Penis Captivus, which captivated the mind of the discerning scientist for ages, to today’s avatar: the Texter’s Thumb.

laurel--hardy---brennender

Or Blackberry Thumb, as this recent CMAJ paper says (1).

Continue reading “Move Over Penis Captivus, Cello Scrotum and Guitar Nipple, we have TEXTER’S THUMB!”

Harry Potter and the Missing Trauma Cases

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ResearchBlogging.orgWith the last Harry Potter movie in the piping (due for a global release this weekend), it is understandable if the Potter craze gets a little irked this time around. And in true keeping with my Pottermania, in this post, I am going to examine the effect the release of Potter books/movies has on us.

I am not the first one to question the impact of Potter on kids and nor will I be the last. In their seminal paper in the BMJ, Gwilym et al establishes beyond reasonable doubt that no matter what the Potter books may do, they reduce ER visits of kids (due to trauma). The authors worked on the premise that: Continue reading “Harry Potter and the Missing Trauma Cases”

House MD 1.01: Dignity in Death

This is the first post in the new series on the blog where I analyze House MD episodes based on the content and scientific interpretation of the same. It is going to be a difficult ride trying to analyze a crazy medical drama in true scientific light, but then again, who said that the things worth doing in life were ever easy? In this post … Continue reading House MD 1.01: Dignity in Death

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Cochrane Students’ Journal Club: An Introduction

Why this Journal Club? Three simple reasons.. To provide students with an opportunity to critically read literature outside their key area of study: To provide students with an opportunity to critically discuss scientific papers. To sensitize them to EBM. Okay. So this is how it goes… A clinical scenario asking a question on the potential management of the case will be posted on the 1st … Continue reading Cochrane Students’ Journal Club: An Introduction

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